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Two Open Ph.D. Positions in Biomechanics

David M. Pierce's picture

August 30, 2013

Two Open Ph.D. Positions in Biomechanics
University of Connecticut, Storrs


Two Ph.D. positions (to fill this year)
(1) Computational Biomechanics: Mathematical modeling and simulation of biomechanical systems from the cellular to the tissue level; implementation of algorithms and material models into finite element codes such as FEAP. Strong background in solid mechanics necessary and some experience with numerical methods desirable.
(2) Experimental Biomechanics: Mechanical and/or optical investigations of soft biological tissues at the macro and microscopic levels. Strong background in mechanics necessary and some experience with mechanical testing desirable.

The Ideal Candidate
Motivated, self-sufficient and creative; strong background in mathematics and mechanics; excellent experience/knowledge of soft biological tissues, particularly cartilage mechanics; prepared to work in a team and to cooperate with medical doctors from both the UConn Health Center and the New England Musculoskeletal Institute; willingness to travel nationally and internationally for research experience; fluency in English; prepared to supervise Masters-level students and project employees at the Pierce Lab.

Candidates for these positions should submit the following as a single PDF file to Professor Pierce via e-mail (submissions are requested by December 1, 2013):
1. Cover letter including a description of:
a. Research interests,
b. Why you feel qualified for this position,
c. How this position will contribute to long term career plans;
2. CV including contact information for at least three references;
3. Selected publications demonstrating research expertise (if available).

Contact
David M. Pierce, Ph.D.
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Department of Mathematics
191 Auditorium Rd. Unit 3139
Storrs, Connecticut 06269-3139
Email: dmpierce@engr.uconn.edu
Phone: +1 860 486 4109

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