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Postdoc and PhD Positions in Granular and Heterogenous Materials, Johns Hopkins University

Ryan C. Hurley's picture

The Hurley Research Group at Johns Hopkins University welcomes applications for a postdoc to begin work in January 2018 and PhD students to join the group in Spring 2018 or Fall 2018.

The selected Postdoctoral candidate will be tasked with developing and using advanced experimental techniques (x-ray tomography, x-ray diffraction, and ultrasound transmission) with the goal of studying compaction, damage, and fragmentation in granular and heterogeneous materials. A portion of this work may be performed at synchrotron radiation facilities. The candidate may also contribute to developing laboratory-based and modeling techniques for studying dynamic failure mechanisms in granular and heterogeneous materials, and ceramics.

The selected candidate will work primarily under the supervision of Professor Hurley. Depending upon the candidate’s strengths, there is also a possibility for the candidate to work in a structured collaboration with scientists at a national laboratory or collaborate with other faculty in the Mechanical Engineering Department or the Hopkins Extreme Materials Institute.

Candidates should have a doctorate in mechanical engineering, civil engineering, materials science, physics, or a related field, and should have a strong understanding of the mechanics of granular and heterogeneous solids, as well as extensive experience in developing and using computational or experimental techniques. If you are interested, please contact professor Hurley to share your curriculum vitae, a one page research statement, a representative journal publication, and at least two references. Applications will be accepted until the position is filled.

Prospective PhD students should be highly-motivated to participate in experimental or computational research related to the mechanics of granular and heterogeneous materials. Candidates should have a degree in mechanical engineering, civil engineering, materials science, physics, or a related field, and a firm understanding of engineering mechanics. To ensure that prospective students are motivated to study the general area of granular and heterogenous materials, they should carefully review current research. Interested individuals should contact Professor Hurley to share their curriculum vitae, two references, and articulate how their research interests align with the research activities of the group.

Johns Hopkins University is committed to building a diverse environment; women and minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. The Johns Hopkins University is an EEO/AA Employer.

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