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Discussion of “Measuring and Understanding Contact Area at the Nanoscale: A Review” by Tevis D. B. Jacobs and Ashlie Martini

Antonio Papangelo's picture

M. Ciavarella(1) and A. Papangelo(2)

(1) Politecnico di BARI, Center of Excellence in Computational Mechanics, Deparment of Mechanics, Mathematics and Management. Viale Gentile 182. 70125 Bari (Italy)

(2) Hamburg University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Am Schwarzenberg-Campus 1, 21073 Hamburg, Germany

michele.ciavarella@poliba.it, antonio.papangelo@poliba.it

Jacobs and Martini (JM in the following) give a nice review of direct measurement methods (in situ electron microscopy), as well as indirect methods (which are based on contact resistance, contact stiffness, lateral forces, and topography) for measurement of the contact area, mostly at nanoscale. They also discuss simulation techniques and theories from single-contact continuum mechanics, to multi-contact continuum mechanics and atomistic accounting. As they recognize, even at very small scales, “multiple-contacts” case occurs, and a returning problem is that the “real contact area” is often an ill-defined, “magnification” dependent quantity. The problem remains to introduce a truncation to the fractal roughness process, what was called in the 1970’s “functional filtering”. The truncation can be “atomic roughness”, or can be due to adhesion, or could be the resolution of the measuring instrument. Obviously, this also means that the strength (hardness) at the nanoscale is ill-defined. Of course, it is perfectly reasonable to fix the “magnification” and observe the dependence of contact area, and strength, on any other variable (speed, temperature, time, etc).

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Antonio_Papangelo

 

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