Carbon nanotube

3 PhD Positions: Carbon Nano-Structured Materials for Aerospace Applications


Carbon Nano-Structured Materials for Aerospace Applications: From Characterization & Multi-scale Modelling to Product Realization- A Holistic Approach


Payam Soltani's picture

Nonlinear and quasi-linear behavior of a curved carbon nanotube vibrating in an electric force field; an analytical approach

 
Nonlinear and quasi-linear behavior of a curved carbon nanotube vibrating in an electric force field; an analytical approach

 By: Payam SOLTANI, A. Kassaei, M. M. Taherian


Kmomeni's picture

Carbon Nanohorn Reinforced Nanocomposites...

I have formulated a shear-lag model for calculating the variation of stress along carbon nanohorns (CNHs), which are conical shaped wrapped carbon sheets, embedded in an epoxy matrix under axial loading.  I found that the stress distribution along the length of CNHs depends on the cone angle of these structures and maximum normal axial stress has a smaller value in CNHs compared to a carbon nanotube (CNT) with same cross-section as of the CNH's tip.  Furthermore, I read an article stating that synthesis of CNHs are easier compared to CNTs.  However, the only article I could find which has studied the CNH-reinforced nanocomposites is


Payam Soltani's picture

Free Vibration of a Carbon Nanotube-Based Mass Sensor

Abstract:

In this paper, nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli beam theory is applied to investigate the dynamical behavior of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) with an extra added nanoparticle. The SWCNT is assumed to be embedded on a Winkler-type elastic foundation with cantilever boundary condition. This configuration can be used as a nano-mass sensor which works on the basis of the changing the natural frequencies. The results show that the added mass causes an obvious increase in sensitivity of SWCNT-based nano-mass sensor, especially for stiff mediums, small nonlocal parameters, and stocky SWCNTs.


Nonlinear free and forced vibration analysis of a single-walled carbon nanotube using shell model

Payam Soltani, J. Saberian, R. Bahramian, and A. Farshidianfar

 

http://fundamentaljournals.org/ijfps/archive.html#A14 

 

In this Paper, the nonlinear free and force vibration of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) with simply supported ends is

investigated based on von Karman’s geometric nonlinearity. The SWCNT described as an individual shell and the Donnell’s

equations of cylindrical shells are used to obtain the governing equations. The Galerkin's procedure is used to discretized partial


A one-dimensional Rod Model for Carbon Nanotubes

We recently published a paper in International Journal of Solids and Structures titled "A rod model for three dimensional deformations of single walled carbon nanotubes".(paper attached)

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0020768311002149

There are several research papers dealing with continuum modeling of a nanotube using shell theory. Longer nanotubes, however, appear more as a one dimensional rod but there is almost no work towards modeling of a nanotube using rod theory. The objective of this paper is to model a nanotube using rod theory. It also highlights challenges and associated future research plans. Not to mention, a one dimensional rod model is advantageous both from theoretical and computational viewpoint.


Kilho Eom's picture

Nanomechanical Resonators and Their Applications in Biological/Chemical Detection: Nanomechanics Principles

Nanomechanical Resonators and Their Applications in Biological/Chemical Detection: Nanomechanics Principles

Kilho Eom, Harold S. Park, Dae Sung Yoon, Taeyun Kwon 

 

Abstract


Jianliang Xiao's picture

van der Waals interaction controls orientations of single-walled carbon nanotubes on quartz during growth

Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) possess extraordinary electrical and mechanical properties, with many possible applications in electronics and materials science. Dense, horizonally aligned arrays of linearly configured SWNTs represent perhaps the most attractive and scalable way to implement this class of nanomaterial in practical systems. Recent work shows that templated growth of tubes on certain crystalline substrates (e.g. quartz) yields arrays with the necessary levels of perfection, as demonstrated by the formation of devices and full systems on quartz. To study the alignment (orientation preference) of SWNTs on quartz substrate, we established a mechanics model for the van der Waals interaction between SWNTs and quartz substrate.


NANOSHEL

NANOSHEL makes more than 50 types of products, among which the main products are nanotubes, SWCNT´s, MWCNT´s, nanoparticles,. These products are widely used in the fields such as textile industry, ceramics, chemical fiber, plastics, coatings, cosmetics, rubber, electrical and electronic equipments, electric power generation and boiler and so on.


Jianliang Xiao's picture

Mechanics of buckled carbon nanotubes on elastomeric substrates

We have studied the scaling of controlled nonlinear buckling processes in materials with dimensions in the molecular range (i.e., ~1 nm) through experimental and theoretical studies of buckling in individual single-wall carbon nanotubes on substrates of poly(dimethylsiloxane). The results show not only the ability to create and manipulate patterns of buckling at these molecular scales, but also, that analytical continuum mechanics theory can explain, quantitatively, all measurable aspects of this system. Inverse calculation applied to measurements of diameterdependent buckling wavelengths yields accurate values of the Young’s moduli of individual SWNTs.


Jianyu Huang's picture

Dislocation Dynamics in Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes

PRL 100, 035503 (2008)  Jianyu Huang, Feng Ding, Boris I. Yakobson  


Harley T. Johnson's picture

Journal Club Theme of September 2007: Quantum Effects in Solid Mechanics

Since the early 1990s, when quantum dots and quantum wires began to attract the attention of physicists, and when carbon nanotubes were discovered, mechanics related issues have begun to emerge as important in understanding properties of nanostructures.  These structures were first considered useful mostly for their electronic or optical applications, yet deformation has been seen to play an important role in their functional characteristics.  Advances in modeling also have begun to link electronic structure with mechanical properties of materials at larger length scales, particularly when microstructural or crystallographic effects influence bulk behavior.


Henry Tan's picture

carbon nanotube-reinforced composite materials

The effect of van der Waals-based interface cohesive law on carbonnanotube-reinforced composite materials

H. Tan, L. Y. Jiang, Y. Huang, B. Liu, and K. C. Hwang
Composite Science and Technology, 2007, accepted.


nyao's picture

Young's modulus of single-walled carbon nanotubes

We report in detail that unlike other materials, carbon nanotubes are so small that changes in structure can affect the Young's modulus. The variation in modulus is attributed to differences in torsional strain, which is the dominant component of the total strain energy. Torsional strain, and correspondingly Young's modulus, increases significantly with decreasing tube diameter and increases slightly with decreasing tube helicity.  Journal of Applied Physics 84, 1939 (1998).


Namiko Yamamoto's picture

Carbon Nanotube Lecture on Nov 1st at MIT

Dr. John Hart from MIT is giving a carbon nanotube (CNT) tutorial at the International Symposoum on Nanomanufacturing (ISNM) at MIT on November 1st, Wednesday. Please see the following if you are interested.


Zhen Zhang's picture

Nanotube 'forest' makes super slippery surface

A material less sticky than Teflon has been created by covering a surface with a "forest" of carbon nanotubes. Newscients.com has a very interesting report. Read more...


Zhen Zhang's picture

Brain Storm and Carbon Nanotubes

Last year, I attended the course ES139/239 in Division of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, the innovation in science and technology. The final project of my group was about carbon nanotube (CNT). In the stage of popping up ideas, we did not consider any feasibility issues, and just used our imagination to create fancy ideas. I was inspired by other guys a lot, felt too excited after the evening brainstorm session, and wrote down the ideas I coined up. Some of them are not nonsense, e.g. replacing Cu by CNT as conductor in integrated circuit (IC). Later on, I find a piece of news in nanotoday (Dec. 2005) that the company Arrowhead Research was to provide $680,000 over two years to Duke University to develop technology for IC based on CNTs. Of course, I am not the first one to come up with this idea. But this means the random imaginative idea is very helpful and sometimes feasible. Another point I learned from this course is to write down at least one idea per day. Keep doing this, then you have a large pool of ideas. One year later, you have 365 ideas. Don’t expect every idea to be useful. Even if just one or two of them are great, it is worthy doing. Imagine that if the future technology originated from one of your ideas, you will contribute the society and feel fullness of ecstasy. If you can realize your idea, you can be a millionaire or billionaire, and then lie on the beach of Caribbean to enjoy the sunshine.


guoxin cao's picture

Carbon nanotubes

Carbon nanotube has been widely investigated and perceived as having great potential in nanomechanical and nanoelectronic devices due to uniqe combination of mechanical, electrical and chemical properties. The carbon nanotubes may be applied (a) as light-weight structural materials with extraordinary mechanical properties such as stiffness and strength; (b) in nano-electronic components as the next-generation of semi-conductors and nanowires; (c) as probes in scanning probe microscopy and atomic force microscopy with the added advantage of a chemically-functionalized tip; (d) as high-sensitivity microbalances; (e) as gas and molecule sensors; (f) in hydrogen storage devices thanks to its high surface-volume ratio; (g) as field-emission type displays; (h) as electrodes in organic light-emitting diodes and (i) as tiny tweezers for nanoscale manipulation, to name a few.

As a postdoc in Xi Chen's group, my current research in the mechanics of carbon nanotubes concentrates in the following areas: a) thermal vibration and application as strain/mass/specie sensors; b) buckling of nanotubes caused by compression, bending, torsion, and indentation; c) mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes in axial and radial directions, and effective continuum modeling; d) fluid conduction in nanotubes. I have published 14 journal papers since 2005 in these areas. I will introduce more details in my blog later.


Teng Li's picture

Strength map of carbon nanotube

 

 

In theory, carbon nanotubes are 100 times stronger than steel at one-sixth the weight, but in practice, scientists have struggled make nanotubes that live up to those predictions. This is partly because there are still many unanswered questions about how nanotubes break and under what conditions.

Recently, Prof. Boris I. Yakobson at Rice University, his former postdoc Traian Dumitrica (now assistant professor at University of Minnesota), and his doctoral student Ming Hua, have developed a new computer modeling approach to create a “strength map” that plots the likelihood or probability that a carbon nanotube will break—and how it’s likely to break. Four critical variables are considered in the model: load level, load duration, temperature, and chirality. This work was published in the Proceedings of the National Adacemy of Sciences (Apr. 18, 2006 Cover feature). Full text pdf file of this paper is available here.


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