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Masayuki Wakamatsu's picture

Cutting Mica Sheet

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Hi iMechanica,

yoursdhruly's picture

Traction separation laws in Cohesive zone models - Some Questions

Hello! 

As a student who has spent a lot of time studying cohesive zone models in fracture mechanics, I have several questions that have bothered me over the past year or so, and I have not been able to find suitable answers to them. I am limiting myself here to questions related to the traction-separation law, which invariably forms the basis of CZM as it is implemented today. I am raising these questions in the hope that I can receive some response here, even if it means my question is invalid (as I suspect a few may be).  So here is my list:

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cracking analyses in a bended sandwich beam

I'm studying cracking analyses in a three point loaded specimen of a composed beam.I'm using ANSYS and i want to create codes for estimation of J integral and energy release rate in the vicinity of crack tip.After that i'll calculate the stresses and strains fields,and then i can compare the equivalent fields i retrived using CTOD  and K(I,II,III) factors (according to ANSYS algorithm).

My problem is that I'd like to find a relationship between the above mentioned quantities(J,G)  with K(I,II,III)factors.

Dean Eastbury's picture

Reminder - abstract submission date for 3rd IC Engineering Failure Analysis

The abstract submission deadline for this next conference in the biennial Engineering Failure Analysis series (www.icefa.elsevier.com) is 30 November 2007.

The conference will take place in the coastal town of Sitges, just a short distance from Barcelona's international airport, from 13 to 16 July 2008.    

Fracture Simulation Using Discrete Lattice Models

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I am trying to implement quasi static fracture in a discrete lattice model, with material being viscoelastic. Do i need to use an incremental-iterative method? Please give your suggestions.

yoursdhruly's picture

Sih's Strain Energy Density Approach in Fracture - why is it not very popular?

Most fracture classes and texts focus on the following different approaches: Griffith's energy approach, Irwin's stress intensity factor approach, the Barenblatt-Dugdale strip yield model (and subsequently, cohesive zone modeling) and Rice's J-Integral approach. As a graduate student studying fracture mechanics, I have often wondered why there seems to be very little discussion in the community with regard to Sih's strain energy density approach. Are there any fundamental limitations to the approach or are there "other" reasons behind this? Your thoughts are appreciated.

Refractory

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hello

i am doing M.tech. i wanted to my destertation in improving the strenght of refractory material. so please guide me what is rectent on this topic...

State-of-the-art understanding of cracking for porous materials?

It seems there are quite a few experimental studies [1,2] on the fracture properties of porous materials, like nanoporous low-k dielectrics, as a function of porosity. Can anyone point out some references on the theoretical part, like the available models, computational methods or analytical approaches that can capture microstructure information, including porosity, pore geometry etc. Interface delamination of porous materials is also of interest. Thanks.

Peridynamic theory vs. classical continuum theory

Dr. Stewart Silling has provided me with a copy of his talk on Peridynamic theory that he presented at McMat 2007.  The PDF file of the talk is attached below.

In order to deal with classical material models and volume constraints, Dr. Silling has modified the original theory to allow for forces that are not necessarily pairwise. A bit on that is included in the talk.

Floating ships of ice and increasing the toughness of glass

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_Habakkuk

I was surprised several years ago when delving into the literature to not find any references about addition of nanoparticles to ice, to study their impact on the mechanics of ice.  In short, to make nanocomposites where the matrix is ice.  So, with 2 high school students from IMSA, the Illinois Math and Science Academy, we set about (with their limited time for a bit of research) to try adding some nanoparticles to water and to freeze it.  The students simply used their home freezers to do this, and their mechanics measurements were with a hammer and chisel...

Markus J. Buehler's picture

Large-scale hierarchical molecular modeling of nanostructured biological materials

There have been several posts recently discussing new directions in computational mechanics. Here is a review article that appeared recently that may be of interest.

Large-scale hierarchical molecular modeling of nanostructured biological materials

Henry Tan's picture

an interesting puzzle: multiscale mechanics

an interesting puzzle for fun:

Lame’s classical solution for an elastic 2D plate, with a hole of radius a and uniform tensile stress applied at the far field, gives a stress concentration factor (SCF) of two at the edge of the hole. This SCF=2 is independent of the hole radius.

Consider what happened to this concentration factor if the radius a approaches infinitely small. The SCF is independent of a, so it remains equal to two even when the hole disappears.

L. Roy Xu's picture

Tensile strength and fracture toughness of nanocomposite materials

Are not as high as we expected although very stiff and strong nanotubes or nanofibers (Young’s modulus E~1000GPa) are added into soft polymer matrices like epoxy (E~4GPa).  In our early investigation on the  systematic mechanical property characterizations of nanocomposites (Xu et al., Journal of Composite Materials, 2004--among top 5 in 2005;and top 10 in 2006 of the Most-Frequently-Read Articles in Journal of Composite Materials.) have shown that there was a very small increase (sometimes even decrease) of critical ultimate tensile/bending strengths, and mode-I fracture toughnesses in spite of complete chemical treatments of the interfacial bonding area, and uniform dispersions of nanofibers (click to view a TEM image). Similar experimental results were often reported in recent years. Therefore, mechanics analysis is extremely valuable before we make these “expensive” nanocomposite materials. Our goal is to provide in-depth mechanics insight, and future directions for nanocomposite development. Till now, nanocomposite materials are promising as multi-functional materials, rather than structural materials. Here we mainly focus on two critical parameters for structural materials: tensile strength and fracture toughness. We notice that other mechanical parameters such as compressive strengths and Young’s moduli of nanocomposite materials have slight increase over their matrices.

High ductility of a metal film adherent on a polymer substrate

In recent development of deformable electronics, it has been noticed that thin metal films often rupture at small tensile strains. Here we report experiments with Cu films deposited on polymeric substrates, and show that the rupture strains of the metal films are sensitive to their adhesion to the substrates. Well-bonded Cu films can sustain strains up to 10% without appreciable cracks, and up to 30% with discontinuous microcracks. By contrast, poorly bonded Cu films form channel cracks at strains about 2%. The cracks form by a mixture of strain localization and intergranular fracture.

Konstantin Volokh's picture

Griffith controversy

Using the Griffith energy method for analysis of cavitation under hydrostatic tension we conclude that the critical tension tends to infinity when the cavity radius approaches zero (IJSS, 2006, doi: 10.1016/j.ijsolstr.2006.12.022). The conclusion is physically meaningless, of course. Moreover, if we assume that the failure process occurs at the edge of the cavity then the critical tension should be length-independent for small but finite cavities while the Griffith analysis always exhibits length-dependence. The main Griffith idea - introduction of the surface energy - is controversial because it sets up the characteristic length, say, surface energy over volume energy. By no means is this approach in peace with the length-independent classical continuum mechanics.

phunguyen's picture

The eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM)

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Hello,

The aim of this writting is to give a brief introduction to the eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM) and investigation of its practical applications.

Firstly introduced in 1999 by the work of Black and Belytschko, XFEM is a local partition of unity (PUM) enriched finite element method. By local, it means that only a region near the discontinuties such as cracks, holes, material interfaces are enriched. The most important concept in this method is "enrichment" which means that the displacement approximation is enriched (incorporated) by additional problem-specific functions. For example, for crack modelling, the Heaviside function is used to enrich nodes whose support cut by the crack face whereas the near tip asymptotic functions are used to model the crack tip singularity (nodes whose support containes the tip are enriched).

CFRAC 2007 International Conference on Computational Fracture and Failure of Materials and Structures

If you are interested by the computational aspects of fracture and failure of materials and structures,there is a dedicated conference for you : CFRAC 2007, which will be held in Nantes, France, 11-13 June 2007. It is an thematic conference of the European Community in Computational Methods in Applied Sciences (ECCOMAS). The for abstract is now closed. This conference wil involve a certian number

Xiao Hu Liu's picture

Delamination in Patterned Films

When the dielectric constant of an insulator in an interconnect is reduced, mechanical properties are often compromised, giving rise to significant challenges in interconnect integration and reliability. Due to low adhesion of the dielectric an interfacial crack may occur during fabrication and testing. To understand the effect of interconnect structure, an interfacial fracture mechanics model has been analyzed for patterned films undergoing a typical thermal excursion during the integration process.

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