User login

You are here

Spring 2009

Tony Rockwell's picture

Addendum To Pressure and Chemical Potential - a question on hydrostatics

The question was raised in class as to what the appropriate equilibrium condition for a column of fluid at rest should be. Specifically, given we expect a hydrostatic gradient in pressure with height, whether  the chemical potential must be the same throughout the column was questioned. Here are my first thoughts. In brief, I assert that  the chemical potential must be everywhere identical, and that the pv term is balanced, at every height in the column, by the potential energy conferred by position in a gravitational field.

Cai Shengqiang's picture

Poroelasticity and diffusion in elastic solids

These are slides of poroelasticity and diffusion in elastic solids for final presentation based on ES241 notes.

Yuhang Hu's picture

advanced elasticity 2009 slides (polyelectrolyte gels)

These slides are based on an on-going paper written by Wei Hong, Xuanhe Zhao and Zhigang Suo and Suo's talk in ucsb.

Final presentation

Attached is my final presentation.

Final presentation slides

Here are the slides for my final presentation for ES 241.  During the presentation, a few suggestions were made, which I plan to follow up on.  Please check back here or subscribe for updates.

Tony Rockwell's picture

Slides on Pressure and Chemical Potential

Here are some slides I made on the subject of "Pressure and Chemical Potential" for the final meeting of Prof. Zhigang Suo's ES 241 class in the Spring of 2009.

Zhigang Suo's picture

A course on Advanced Elasticity, with emphasis on thermodynamics and soft active materials

In the field of Solid Mechanics, Harvard has a sequence of 5 graduate courses:

The first course goes over linear elasticity, finite element method, vibration, waves, viscoelasticity, as well as some ideas of finite deformation.

Zhigang Suo's picture

Finite Deformation: Special Cases

The notes on finite deformation have been divided into two parts: special cases and general theory (node/538). In class I start with special cases, and then sketch the general theory. But the two parts can be read in any order.

Zhigang Suo's picture

Free Energy

For a system in thermal contact with the rest of the world, we have described three quantities: entropy, energy, and temperature. We have also described the idea of a constraint internal to the system, and associated this constraint to an internal variable.

Zhigang Suo's picture

ES 241 Advanced Elasticity Final Examination

Update on 23 May 2009:  I'm adding links to the slides as they are uploaded.

The final exam will take the form of a pedagogical workshop. We have 8 students taking the class for credit. I have divided the lecture notes into 8 parts as follows.

Zhigang Suo's picture

Poroelasticity, or migration of matter in elastic solids

A sponge is an elastic solid with connected pores. When immersed in water, the sponge absorbs water. When a saturated sponge is squeezed, water will come out. More generally, the subject is known as diffusion in elastic solids, or elasticity of fluid-infiltrated porous solids, or poroelasticity. The theory has been applied to diverse phenomena. Here are a few examples.

Zhigang Suo's picture

Pressure

So far we have been mainly concerned with systems of a single independent variable: energy (node/4878). We now consider a system of two independent variables: energy and volume. A thermodynamic model of the system is prescribed by entropy as a function of energy and volume.

The partial derivatives of the function give the temperature and the pressure. This fact leads to an experimental procedure to determine the function for a given system.

The laws of ideal gases and osmosis are derived. The two phenomena illustrate entropic elasticity.

Zhigang Suo's picture

Engineering Sciences 241: Advanced Elasticity

This is a second graduate course in solid mechanics.  Building on thermodynamics and linear algebra, the course explores coupled mechanical, thermal, electrical, and chemical actions.  The course draws heavily upon phenomena in soft active materials.

This page is updated for ES 241 taught in Fall 2017 (See also Google doc for lecture-by-lecture record and homework)

The course taught in the past:

Subscribe to RSS - Spring 2009

Recent comments

More comments

Syndicate

Subscribe to Syndicate