tendon

Tissue strain-rate independence

I have two basic questions for the experts in the soft tissue biomechanics community. 

a) I am interested in the biomechanics of a specific tendon in a specific high-speed deformation. How plausible is it for me to assume strain-rate independence, and therefore, the existence of a strain energy function? In other words, how accurate is the assumption of pseudoelasticity for tendons under high strain-rate? I feel comfortable with the assumption (evidence would help a lot, however) for tissues such as mesentery, skin and, I guess, even muscle. 


azadpoor's picture

Call for special issue papers: Mechanics of cells, tissues, and biomaterials

The paramount role of mechanics in life has recently been the center of attention of many researchers. This special issue will be focusing on the role of mechanics in the life of cells and tissues and their interactions with biomaterials. Original research and review papers are solicited for review and publication in the journal Mechanical Sciences . Mechanical Sciences is an academic open-access journal sponsored by the Library of Delft University of Technology and The Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO). Thanks to the generous financial support of The Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research, all manuscripts will be processed and published free of any charge.


Mark S Thompson's picture

Mechanobiology post-doctoral position, Oxford, UK

A postdoctoral research position is available immediately at the Mechanobiology Group, Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatologyand Musculoskeletal Sciences at the University of Oxford to study tendon mechanobiology and repair following injury or pathology. This is an exciting opportunity to join a multi-disciplinary team drawn from the Botnar Research Centre, the Oxford Institute of Biomedical Engineering and the John Radcliffe Hospital to work at the forefront of strategically important musculoskeletal research.


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