atomistic modeling

Rouzbeh1's picture

Two Post-doctoral Associate Positions Available at Rice University

Position Description: Two postdoctoral associate positions, one in computations and one in experiments, are available at Rice University. The first position is in the area of atomistic and molecular modeling of nanoscale defects, dislocations and mechanics of complex, low symmetry compounds. The computational techniques will be integrated to approaches from statistical mechanics and physical chemistry to provide quantitative predictions of properties of complex materials across different time- and length-scales. 


Rouzbeh1's picture

Post-doc Position in Atomistic Modeling at Rice University

A postdoctoral associate position is available at Rice University in the
area of atomistic and molecular modeling of nanoscale friction and defects in an assembly of
nanoparticles. Computational techniques will be integrated to approaches from statistical
mechanics and physical chemistry to provide quantitative predictions of properties of complex
oxide materials across different time- and length-scales. The research will be carried out at Rice
University's Multiscale Materials Modeling Lab.


Rouzbeh1's picture

PhD and Post-doctoral Associate Positions Available at Rice University

Ph.D and postdoctoral associate positions are available at Rice University in the broad area of atomistic, molecular and multiscale modeling of cement-based materials. The projects include carrying out bottom-up atomistic and microtexture predictive simulations. Computational techniques will be integrated to approaches from statistical mechanics and physical chemistry to provide quantitative predictions of properties of cementitious materials across different time- and length-scales. The research will be carried out at Rice University’s Laboratory for Multiscale
Materials Modeling.


Kilho Eom's picture

Nanomechanical Resonators and Their Applications in Biological/Chemical Detection: Nanomechanics Principles

Nanomechanical Resonators and Their Applications in Biological/Chemical Detection: Nanomechanics Principles

Kilho Eom, Harold S. Park, Dae Sung Yoon, Taeyun Kwon 

 

Abstract


Job opening at Institute of High Performance Computing, ASTAR, Singapore

As a proud member of the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), the Institute of High Performance Computing (IHPC) was established in April 1998 to provide leadership in high performance computing as a strategic resource for scientific inquiry and industry development. Our mission is to advance science and technology and develop leading-edge applications through high performance computing and computational science.

We are looking for highly motivated individuals who possess excellent analytical, technical, and problem-solving skills, as well as good technical writing and presentation skills. If you share our interests in solving challenging scientific problems using computational science and engineering techniques, we welcome you to apply for the following position:


Position: RESEARCH ENGINEER
Project name: Wax and Gas Hydrate Formation


Rui Huang's picture

a point and a particle

A few of us have been discussing/debating over the existence or non-existence of Cauchy stress questioned in a theory proposed by Mr. Falk H. Koenemann. While such discussions may appear funny or irrelevant to many mechanicians, I take it as a challenge from an educational point of view to clearly understand what continuum mechanics is about and if any what are its limitations. Unfortunately, the discussions have not been fruitful and probably have become annoying to many who read imechanica. For that I apologize from my part. However, I remain hopeful that some consensus may be reached, if we can clear out or admit the misconceptions that have been brought up in the discussions from both sides. To begin with, I summarize below in a list of possible misconceptions about a point in a continuum and a particle in a discrete system. It is my understanding that the two are fundamentally different but have been mixed up in Mr. Koenemann's theory as well as in the discussions. As many mechanicians are doing research in both continuum mechanics and discrete modeling (e.g., atomistic, molecular dynamics), such a list may not be totally irrelevant. Of course I would welcome comments and discussions to make the list more accurate and more complete.


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