Geometric mechanics

Arash_Yavari's picture

PhD Position in Geometric Mechanics at Georgia Tech

I am looking for a new Ph.D. student to work on discretization of nonlinear elasticity using geometric and topological ideas. Requirements for this position are a strong background in solid mechanics and some background in differential geometry and analysis. If interested please email me your CV.


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A Geometric Structure-Preserving Discretization Scheme for Incompressible Linearized Elasticity

In this paper, we present a geometric discretization scheme for incompressible linearized elasticity. We use ideas from discrete exterior calculus (DEC) to write the action for a discretized elastic body modeled by a simplicial complex. After characterizing the configuration manifold of volume-preserving discrete deformations, we use Hamilton's principle on this configuration manifold. The discrete Euler-Lagrange equations are obtained without using Lagrange multipliers. The main difference between our approach and the mixed finite element formulations is that we simultaneously use three different discrete spaces for the displacement field.


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Affine Development of Closed Curves in Weitzenbock Manifolds and the Burgers Vector of Dislocation Mechanics

In the theory of dislocations, the Burgers vector is usually defined by referring to a crystal structure. Using the notion of affine development of curves on a differential manifold with a connection, we give a differential geometric definition of the Burgers vector directly in the continuum setting, without making use of an underlying crystal structure. As opposed to some other approaches to the continuum definition of the Burgers vector, our definition is completely geometric, in the sense that it involves no ambiguous operations like the integration of a vector field--when we integrate a vector field, it is a vector field living in the tangent space at a given point in the manifold.


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Geometric Growth Mechanics

This paper presents a geometric theory of the mechanics of growing bodies.

This paper is dedicated to the memory of Professor Jim Knowles.

http://lanl.arxiv.org/abs/0911.4671


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