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Roughness

Mike Ciavarella's picture

On Pastewka and Robbins' Criterion for Macroscopic Adhesion of Rough Surfaces

On Pastewka and Robbins' Criterion for Macroscopic Adhesion of Rough Surfaces

M. Ciavarella

[+] Author and Article Information

J. Tribol 139(3), 031404 (Nov 30, 2016) (5 pages)

Paper No: TRIB-16-1057; doi: 10.1115/1.4034530

History: Received February 15, 2016; Revised July 18, 2016

ARTICLE

REFERENCES

Abstract

Abstract | Introduction | A Simple Asperity Model | Pull-Off | Discussion | Conclusion | References

marco.paggi's picture

EUROMECH Colloquium 575 on Contact Mechanics and Coupled Problems in Surface Phenomena

Dear Colleague,
  we would like to inform you that the EUROMECH Colloquium 575 on “Contact Mechanics and Coupled Problems in Surface Phenomena” will take place in the IMT Institute for Advanced Studies Lucca (Lucca, Italy) from March 30, 2015 to April 2, 2015.  

Pradeep Sharma's picture

Surface Energy, Elasticity and the Homogenization of Rough Surfaces

The attached paper was recently accepted for publication in Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids.

Wavelengths of surface features

I am working on the surface features of steel . I understand that surface features are broken down into various wavelengths and represented as Wa to We (0.1mm to 30mm wavelengths). Could some guide me to a reference which shows how to go about this process from the raw surface profile data ? Possibly, it involves Fourier Transforms, but I need a basic reference which shows how it is done .

 

Thanks!

 

Henry Tan's picture

Surface roughness evolution

With a shallow chemical etching the roughness with spatial frequency below a critical value grows while the roughness of higher frequency decays.

node/1312

Surface Roughness and Electrical Contact Resistance

J.R.Barber The contact of rough surfaces Surfaces are rough on the microscopic scale, so contact is restricted to a few `actual contact areas'. If a current flows between two contacting bodies, it has to pass through these areas, causing an electrical contact resistance. The problem can be seen as analogous to a large number of people trying to get out of a hall through a small number of doors.

Classical treatments of the problem are mostly based on the approximation of the surfaces as a set of `asperities' of idealized shape. The real surfaces are represented as a statistical distribution of such asperities with height above some datum surface. However, modern measurement techniques have shown surfaces have multiscale, quasi-fractal characteristics over a wide range of length scales. This makes it difficult to decide on what scale to define the asperities.

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