Dislocation

Ting Zhu's picture

Surface dislocation nucleation

 

  Surface dislocation nucleation

Ting Zhu, Ju Li, Amit Samanta, Austin Leach and Ken Gall, “Temperature and strain-rate dependence of surface dislocation nucleation”, Physical Review Letters, 100, 025502 (2008).


Jianyu Huang's picture

Dislocation Dynamics in Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes

PRL 100, 035503 (2008)  Jianyu Huang, Feng Ding, Boris I. Yakobson  


The dislocations and grain bounday.

When dislocation meet the grain boundary. The grain boundary present obstacles to dislocation motion. A usual point is that the dislocation will pile up against the grain boundary(But from the expriments , it seldomly see this phenomenon.). Macroscopic yielding occours when the adjacent grain can deform plastically Which maybe effected by the emission of dislocation from the grain boundary, or in another way , the pileup dislocation can produce a stress concentration which can active the dislocation source in the adjacent grain. As we knowe ,in polycrystalline, the material will express a Hall-Petch relationship between the yielding stress and the grain dimension. There are many models to explain the H-P relationship,such as pile-up dislocations, average fress distance....


Cai Wei's picture

Dislocations 2008 International Conference

We are pleased to announce Dislocations 2008, an international conference on the fundamentals of plastic deformation and other physical phenomena where the dislocations play pivotal roles.  The conference will take place on October 13-17, 2008 at the Gold Coast Hotel, Hong Kong, China.  More information about the Dislocations 2008 conference can be found at the following web site:


Kejie Zhao's picture

Question: Is the local energy dictating dislocation emission constant for single crystal?

Hi everyone, in my size dependence study, I find the local energy dictating dislocation emission is almost constant for varied sized samples, in given directions of single crystal. I don't know this is an interesing finding, or just a common sense. Will you give me some suggestion, Thank you!

Kejie


Honghui Yu's picture

Integral Formulations for 2D Elasticity: 1. Anisotropic Materials

Might also be useful for simulating dislocation motion in a finite body.

Several sets of boundary integral equations for two dimensional elasticity are derived from Cauchy integral theorem.These equations reveal the relations between displacements and resultant forces, between displacements and tractions, and between the tangential derivatives of displacements and tractions on solid boundary.Special attention is given to the formulation that is based on tractions and the tangential derivatives of displacements on boundary, because its integral kernels have the weakest singularities.The formulation is further extended to include singular points, such as dislocations and line forces, in a finite body, so that the singular stress field can be directly obtained from solving the integral equations on the external boundary without involving the linear superposition technique often used in the literature. Body forces and thermal effect are subsequently included. The general framework of setting up a boundary value problem is discussed and continuity conditions at a non-singular corner are derived.  The general procedure in obtaining the elastic field around a circular hole is described, and the stress fields with first and second order singularities are obtained. Some other analytical solutions are also derived by using the formulation. 


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