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Stress Tensor

Stress is defined as the quantity equal to ... what?

In introducing the very concept of the stress tensor to the beginning student, text-books always present only indirect relations involving the concept. Thus, you have the relations like "traction = (stress-transposed)(unit normal)" (i.e. Cauchy's formula, for uniform stress), or the relations for the coordinate transformations of the stress tensor, or the divergence theorem (for non-uniform stress). These are immediately followed or interspersed with alternative notations, and the rules for using them.

But what you never ever get to see, in text-books or references, is this: a *direct* definition of the stress tensor, i.e. an equation in which there is only the stress tensor on the left hand-side, and some expression involving some *other* quantities on right hand-side. Why? What possibly could be the conceptual and pedagogical advantages of giving a direct definition of this kind, and its physical meaning? I would like to ponder on these matters here, giving my answers to these and similar questions in the process.

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Stress invariants for anisotropic materials

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Hello everyone,

Does anyone know how to obtain stress invariants for an anisotropic materials, for example a composite material and there are how many of them? Could you pinpoint me to the correct reference?

Thanks a lot.

Khong

hiader k. mahbes's picture

Plasticity and elasticity questions

 Dear AllI has question about these stresses.1.Are deviatoric stress generate plastic deformation?2. Are hydrostatic stress generate plastic deformation?3.What is the advantage of transferring strain tenser orientation to the principle coordinate axes? 4. What is the difference between rupture and fracture stress?

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