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Centre for Advanced Materials's picture

12 PhD and 2 Postdoctoral Research Associate positions in materials science

The Centre for Advanced Materials (Zentrum für Hochleistungsmaterialien – ZHM) is a joint institution in Hamburg, Germany, bringing together scientists from universities and non-university research organizations in the area of materials science and technology.

mohdfadzli's picture

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS & EXHIBITION: MITC2015

It is our sincere pleasure to invite you to participate in the upcoming Malaysian International Tribology Conference 2015 (MITC2015). For quick information, feel free to watch our teaser at http://youtu.be/HwLON3uIz3MFor more details, you are kindly advice to visit our website at http://mitc2015.mytribos.org

Shiva Rudraraju's picture

University of Michigan Continuum Physics and FEM lectures available online

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Open.Michigan is a University of Michigan initiative that enables faculty, students, and others to share their educational resources and research with the global learning community. As part of this, Continuum Physics and Finite Element Method lectures offered by Prof. Krishna Garikipati are now available online on youtube and open.umich.edu.


Oleg Kirillov's picture

Nonlinear Physical Systems: Spectral Analysis, Stability and Bifurcations

Bringing together 18 chapters written by leading experts in dynamical systems, operator theory, partial differential equations, and solid- and fluid mechanics, this book presents state-of-the-art approaches to a wide spectrum of new and challenging stability problems.

Physical Foundations of Continuum Mechanics

After many publications and lecture notes, Prof. Ian Murdoch has finally organized much of that material in the form of a book.

I am very hopeful that like Prof. Murdoch's lectures, this monograph will also help the readers to develop a better understanding of the physical aspects of mechanics. It will be a valuable addition to the researchers' personal collection. 

Link:

Journals in Physics and Engineering, and Preprint Servers Like arXiv

Hi all,

 

1. In the past, we have had quite some discussion regarding both open-access and open-access journals. However the slant in this blog post is different. I am not concerned here much about open-access journals per say.

What would you choose as the Top 5 Equations? Top 10?

Equations are of central importance in all of science and engineering, but especially so in mechanics.

Even leaving aside algebraic equations, handbooks on PDEs alone list hundreds of equations. However, a few of these do stand out, either because they encapsulate some fundamental aspect of physics/science/engg., or because they serve as simpler prototypes for more complex situtations, or simply because they are so complex as to be fascinating by themselves. There might be other considerations too... But the fact is, some equations really do stand out as compared to others.

Position in Computational Geomechanics

Job Title:Computational Geomechanics Job Summary:ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company has an immediate opening in Computational Mechanics for research scientist at our Corporate Strategic Research Laboratory. Our lab focuses on fundamental science that can lead to technologies having a direct impact on the oil and gas industry.

Project Tuva (Feynman's lecture series)

Here is an interesting link I came across while searching for the Feynman lectures -- Project Tuva.

http://research.microsoft.com/apps/tools/tuva/

It provides each of Prof. Feynman's seven lectures delivered at Cornell as a part of the Messenger lecture series. This format of posting lectures by Microsoft is absolutely amazing. I hope more such lectures especially videos of keynote lectures in leading conferences and congresses can be made available online.

-Arun

Food for Thought: A Few Recent arXiv Papers

Since my research touches on the basics of QM, I have developed this habit of visiting arXiv.org every now and then. Last week or so, at arXiv.org, I found a couple of interesting articles on physics in general. I would like to share these with you.

The Fundamental Physical Bases of the WR Approach (and, Consequently, of FEM) in General

It has been quite some time (more than 1.5 years) that I had touched upon the topic of the physical bases of FEM in general, and of the general weighted residual (WR) approach in particular, at iMechanica (see here).

The position I then took was that there is no known physical basis at all for the WR approach---despite its loving portrayals in mathematical terms, or its popularity.

A lack of heroes, a lack of open culture

One of the things that I've thought about often in relation to mechanics is:

Henry Tan's picture

physics of explosion

Notes for Physics of Explosion

Why lionize mathematics in science/engineering?

This has reference to (only) the *last paragraph* in Prof. Harry Lewis' recent post, found at: node/1423#comment-2880.

The reason I write the present post is because I always seem to have had a view of inventing, learning, or teaching mathematics that is remarkably at odds with what Prof. Lewis' last paragraph *seems* to imply.

MichelleLOyen's picture

We must not forget to teach the fundamentals

An interesting blog discussion on the disappearance of fundamentals from teaching in Universities was brought to my attention.  It serves as an interesting reminder that we who are educators in the University system must be ever vigilent in planning mechanics curricula and changes to curriculum.  Should we be offering courses in the area of this month's jClub, "Nanomechanics"?  Should we drop classical courses that have stopped being interesting to the majority of students (and thus attract low numbers)?  Should we educate students explicitly in biomechanics without providing them a classical mechanics background?  These are the questions we are likely to face in the next few years as change continues to sweep across the university system, especialy in the US but elsewhere as well.  I believe that we as a community have a responsibility here to ensure that the high standards of the discipline are maintained through teaching of fundamentals and the passing along of these values to future generations!

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