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Updated: 22 hours 59 min ago

Dear Philipp,

Thu, 2019-02-14 14:13

In reply to Dear Steve,

Dear Philipp,

Thanks for the comment!  We have done some work with 3D (wrinkled) structures using an approach similar to what you've described (Taylor et al. Adv. Mater. 2016, 28, 2595-2600).  The interesting result here was that, by controlling the thin-film microstructure of the hard overlayer using strain, you could access mechano-optical effects.  Namely the transition from reflective to scattering states.  Using this concept we created "skins" with locally switchable reflectance (see Fig. 4 and Video S5).  I think the TOC nicely captures this concept.

We are continuing to build on this concept to manipulate polymer micromaterials.

Thanks again Philipp,

Best,

Steve

 

Great work!

Wed, 2019-02-13 18:17

In reply to Journal Club for February 2019: Stretchable Chemical Templates: New Tools for the Fabrication of Polymer Microstructures and Actuators

Hi Dr. Morin,

Thanks for posting your work here, it is very interesting and beautifully done. We've actually used some of your techniques for bonding thermoplastics/elastomers in the past, so thank you!

I have a few questions for you:

1) Relating to the assembled PS structures - are their mechanical properties fairly uniform, or do you notice weakness at the bonded interfaces? Also, have you tried a multi-step process for bonding these structures (with sequel stretching in various directions) in order to create two-dimensional structures? 

2) I can envision using your chemical templates to create microscale electrostatic actuators. In particular, we work on HASEL actuators, which are simply a polymer pouch filled with liquid dielectric, and electrodes on the outside. It seems like your process could be used to create tunable microscale HASEL actuators by precisely defining regions wetted by the liquid dielectric. Haven't figured out how you bond another polymer layer over that yet =). Anyway, has your group ever tried making electrostatic actuators using this process, or have you only explored humidity-sensitive actuators thus far?

Again, very cool work. Thanks for sharing.

Best,

Nicholas Kellaris

Great work!

Wed, 2019-02-13 18:17

In reply to Journal Club for February 2019: Stretchable Chemical Templates: New Tools for the Fabrication of Polymer Microstructures and Actuators

Hi Dr. Morin,

Thanks for posting your work here, it is very interesting and beautifully done. We've actually used some of your techniques for bonding thermoplastics/elastomers in the past, so thank you!

I have a few questions for you:

1) Relating to the assembled PS structures - are their mechanical properties fairly uniform, or do you notice weakness at the bonded interfaces? Also, have you tried a multi-step process for bonding these structures (with sequel stretching in various directions) in order to create two-dimensional structures? 

2) I can envision using your chemical templates to create microscale electrostatic actuators. In particular, we work on HASEL actuators, which are simply a polymer pouch filled with liquid dielectric, and electrodes on the outside. It seems like your process could be used to create tunable microscale HASEL actuators by precisely defining regions wetted by the liquid dielectric. Haven't figured out how you bond another polymer layer over that yet =). Anyway, has your group ever tried making electrostatic actuators using this process, or have you only explored humidity-sensitive actuators thus far?

Again, very cool work. Thanks for sharing.

Best,

Nicholas Kellaris

Dear Steve,

Tue, 2019-02-12 00:48

In reply to Journal Club for February 2019: Stretchable Chemical Templates: New Tools for the Fabrication of Polymer Microstructures and Actuators

Dear Steve,

this is very interesting work. Have you ever tried to use this technique to fabricate 3D-structures? For example by coating the entire surface with a material that only bonds to the chemical template, so that when the substrate relaxes the material between the bonded areas can buckle out of plane.

Best

Philipp

Dear Steve,

Tue, 2019-02-12 00:48

In reply to Journal Club for February 2019: Stretchable Chemical Templates: New Tools for the Fabrication of Polymer Microstructures and Actuators

Dear Steve,

this is very interesting work. Have you ever tried to use this technique to fabricate 3D-structures? For example by coating the entire surface with a material that only bonds to the chemical template, so that when the substrate relaxes the material between the bonded areas can buckle out of plane.

Best

Philipp

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Wed, 2019-02-06 17:25

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Wed, 2019-02-06 17:25

Normals and Faces

Fri, 2019-02-01 14:09

In reply to How to automate surface creation in Abaqus ?

Assuming it is a quad (and not tetra mesh), such type of irregular selection often arises due to inconsistent element surface normals. Another thing I remember from the time I used to do similar work is that the ordering of faces of each element also needs to be consistent. 

 

Normals and Faces

Fri, 2019-02-01 14:09

In reply to How to automate surface creation in Abaqus ?

Assuming it is a quad (and not tetra mesh), such type of irregular selection often arises due to inconsistent element surface normals. Another thing I remember from the time I used to do similar work is that the ordering of faces of each element also needs to be consistent. 

 

Highlighted in Science Translational Medicine

Fri, 2019-02-01 09:47

In reply to A biohybrid valveless pump-bot powered by engineered skeletal muscle

This work is recently highlighted in Science Translational Medicine as editors' choice. The below is the link: 

Sam H. Au, Squeezing inspiration from embryonic hearts, Science Translational Medicine (2019), 11, eaaw5317. 

 

Highlighted in Science Translational Medicine

Fri, 2019-02-01 09:47

In reply to A biohybrid valveless pump-bot powered by engineered skeletal muscle

This work is recently highlighted in Science Translational Medicine as editors' choice. The below is the link: 

Sam H. Au, Squeezing inspiration from embryonic hearts, Science Translational Medicine (2019), 11, eaaw5317. 

 

but how?

Mon, 2019-01-28 07:49

In reply to Who can delete my blog entry?

 How I delete my own blog entry?

but how?

Mon, 2019-01-28 07:49

In reply to Who can delete my blog entry?

 How I delete my own blog entry?

Abaqus mailing list

Sat, 2019-01-26 11:01

In reply to Why a 2D and 3D model using a coupled thermal displacement element in ABAQUS give different results? Can any one help me?

Hello

 

subscribe to and seek assistance from the

ABAQUS mailing list

https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/Abaqus/info

Search the archive of the list before posting in it.

The list does not accept attachments.

 

Good luck

 

Frank

Abaqus mailing list

Sat, 2019-01-26 11:01

In reply to Why a 2D and 3D model using a coupled thermal displacement element in ABAQUS give different results? Can any one help me?

Hello

 

subscribe to and seek assistance from the

ABAQUS mailing list

https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/Abaqus/info

Search the archive of the list before posting in it.

The list does not accept attachments.

 

Good luck

 

Frank

Thanks Tongqing!

Fri, 2019-01-25 04:05

In reply to Congratulations Guoying!

Thanks Tongqing!

Thanks Tongqing!

Fri, 2019-01-25 04:05

In reply to Congratulations Guoying!

Thanks Tongqing!

Professor Postion in Continuum Mechanics

Tue, 2019-01-22 08:10

In reply to Professor Position (Full Professor) in Continuum Mechanics at the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Leibniz University Hannover, Germany

Pleas enote, that there is an opening for a position for a full professor in continuum mechanics at Leibniz University Hannover. The postion is related to the institute of continuums mechanics 

https://www.ikm.uni-hannover.de/kontinuumsmechanik.html?&no_cache=1&L=1

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