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Harold S. Park's blog

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Reminder: IMECE 2011: Minisymposium on Multiphysics Simulations and Experiments for Solids

Dear Colleagues:

We would like to invite you to submit an abstract for the 2011 ASME
IMECE in Denver, to be held November 11-17, 2011.  Our minisymposium
is on "Multiphysics Simulations for Solids", and is the
continuation of a very successful minisymposium held for the past 4 years
that have resulted in more than 50 presentations at the 2009 and 2010 IMECE conferences.  This year's focus areas
are:

1.Multiphysics modeling, simulation and experiments of electromechanical materials and systems

Harold S. Park's picture

IMECE 2011: Minisymposium on Multiphysics Simulations and Experiments for Solids

Dear Colleagues:

We would like to invite you to submit an abstract for the 2011 ASME
IMECE in Denver, to be held November 11-17, 2011.  Our minisymposium
is on "Multiphysics Simulations for Solids", and is the
continuation of a very successful minisymposium held for the past 4 years
that have resulted in more than 50 presentations at the 2009 and 2010 IMECE conferences.  This year's focus areas
are:

1.Multiphysics modeling, simulation and experiments of electromechanical materials and systems

Harold S. Park's picture

Postdoc Position in Computational Nanomechanics at Boston University

The computational nanomechanics laboratory (http://people.bu.edu/parkhs/), which is based at Boston University under the direction of Prof. Harold Park, is looking to recruit a highly motivated and independent postdoctoral researcher to study, via the development of new computational methodologies, various scientific issues surrounding the mechanics of crystalline nanostructures.  The position is available for a 1-year duration, with possible extension to future years depending on the availability of funding.  

Harold S. Park's picture

IMECE 2010 - Minisymposium on Multiphysics Simulations and Experiments for Solids

Dear Colleagues:

We would like to invite you to submit an abstract for the 2010 ASME IMECE in Vancouver, to be held November 12-18, 2010.  Our minisymposium is on "Multiphysics Simulations and Experiments for Solids", and is the continuation of a very successful minisymposium held at the 2009 IMECE that resulted in more than 50 presentations.  This year's focus areas are:

1.Multiphysics modeling, simulation and experiments of electromechanical materials and systems

2.Multiphysics modeling, simulation  and experiments of optomechanical materials and systems

Harold S. Park's picture

Tenure-Track Positions in (1) Solid Mechanics and (2) Bioengineering at the University of Colorado

The Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Colorado
at Boulder invites applications for two full-time positions beginning
fall 2010. The positions are for tenure-track assistant professors with
disciplinary expertise in the areas of (1) Bioengineering (posting #808181), and (2) Solid Mechanics/Materials Physics (posting #808182);
higher rank may be considered for experienced candidates. Candidates
are expected to strongly complement and strengthen existing
departmental research in biomechanical/biomaterials engineering, energy
and environmental engineering, micro/nanosystems engineering, materials
engineering or solid/fluid mechanics. Candidates must have an earned

Harold S. Park's picture

USNCTAM 2010: Minisymposium on Mechanics of Crystalline Nanostructures

Horacio Espinosa and I welcome the submission of new abstracts for a minisymposium on "Mechanics of Crystalline Nanostructures", to be held at the 2010 US National Congress on Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (USNCTAM 2010), June 27-July 2 at Penn State University. 

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Keynote Lecture by Prof. Ted Belytschko at 2008 ASME IMECE in Boston

I would like to invite everyone attending the 2008 ASME IMECE next week in Boston to attend a keynote lecture given by Prof. Ted Belytschko of Northwestern University.  The lecture will occur at 1:45 PM on Tuesday, November 4, and will be entitled "Multiscale Computations of Fracture - When Does Flaw Tolerance Occur?" 

Further information on Prof. Belytschko's talk can be found here: 

http://www.asmeconferences.org/Congress08/PlenarySessions.cfm

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Journal Club November 2007: Surface Effects on Nanomaterials

Nanoscale materials, including thin films, quantum dots, nanowires, nanobelts, etc – are all structurally unique because they have a relatively high ratio of surface area to volume ratio.  This increase in surface area to volume ratio is important for nanomaterials because wide and unexpected variations in mechanical and other physical properties, such as thermal, electrical and optical, have been found to scale in some proportion to increase in surface area to volume ratio.

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Material Instability - Questions

Hello All:

I'm interested in learning more about material instability, for example the localization criterions of Hill (1962) and Rudnicki and Rice (1975).  I also am aware of work by Rice (1976), in which a perturbation is made to the displacement field in the form of a plane harmonic wave, resulting in a strong ellipticity instability condition that looks like Det(Q), where Q = c_ijkl + Sigma_jk, i.e. a competition between material softening and stress increase determines the instability.  Furthermore, this stability criterion is developed assuming an infinite body.

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Deformation of FCC Nanowires by Twinning and Slip

We present atomistic simulations of the tensile and compressive loading of single crystal FCC nanowires with <100> and <110> orientations to study the propensity of the nanowires to deform via twinning or slip.  By studying the deformation characteristics of three FCC materials with disparate stacking fault energies (gold, copper and nickel), we find that the deformation mechanisms in

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Modeling Surface Stress Effects on Nanomaterials

We present a surface Cauchy-Born approach to modeling FCC metals with nanometer scale dimensions for which surface stresses contribute significantly to the overall mechanical response. The model is based on an extension of the traditional Cauchy-Born theory in which a surface energy term that is obtained from the underlying crystal structure and governing interatomic potential is used to augment the bulk energy.

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