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Lee Margetts's blog

Yield behaviour of trabecular bone

A recently published paper  "Evaluating the macroscopic yield behaviour of trabecular bone using a nonlinear homogenisation approach" links the micromechanics of bone to its macroscopic behaviour. The paper may be of interest to colleagues on this forum. The abstract is provided below.

Abstract:

Summer School - HPC for Engineering Simulation

The STFC Hartree Centre (in Warrington, UK - located between Manchester & Liverpool) is running 4 high performance computing summer schools from June to July 2016. They are primarily aimed at PhD students and postdoctoral researchers, but are also open to academics and industry at no extra cost. The tuition fees are subsidised by STFC and each week only costs £150. There is a 1 week school on each of the following topics:

PhD Vacancy: UK Centre for Doctoral Training in Fusion Energy

I am currently looking to fill an open PhD position in a project titled:

Advanced Virtual Design of 3D Printed Fusion Reactor Components

This is to continue recent work that uses X-ray tomography, high performance computing and finite element analysis to design the plasma facing wall of the ITER reactor. Recent related publications can be found below:

PhD in Biomaterials for Aerospace Composites

Applications are invited for a fully funded PhD studentship at the University of Manchester to help develop the next generation of simulation tools. These will be used to evaluate the structural integrity of novel aerospace composites under a wide range of operational conditions.

PhD Positions in Advanced Virtual Prototyping at the University of Manchester

I am currently recruiting new PhD students to join my research group at The School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering at the University of Manchester. The core focus of the group is advanced computing for engineering simulation. My research interests centre on extreme scale parallel computing, cloud computing and virtual reality simulation platforms, applied to scientific and engineering problems involving complex processes.

PhD Positions in Advanced Virtual Prototyping at the University of Manchester

I am currently recruiting new PhD students to join my research group at The School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering at the University of Manchester. The core focus of the group is advanced computing for engineering simulation. My research interests centre on extreme scale parallel computing, cloud computing and virtual reality simulation platforms, applied to scientific and engineering problems involving complex processes.

Short Course: Advanced Methods in Computational Fluid Dynamics

Advanced Methods in Computational Fluid Dynamics 

7-10 September 2015 

Continuing Professional Development Course 

University of Manchester and STFC Daresbury Laboratory, United Kingdom 

Research Software Engineer Fellowship

The UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) is offering Research Software Engineer (RSE) Fellowships for a period of up to five years. The RSE Fellowship describes exceptional individuals with combined expertise in programming and a solid knowledge of the research environment. The eligibility criteria and details of how to apply can be found on the EPSRC website.

PhD Studentship: "Advanced Virtual Prototyping for Sustainable Energy Generation"

I have an EPSRC CASE PhD Studentship on offer that is co-funded by Alstom PLC.

There are three aims: (i) to couple ParaFEM with OpenFOAM for massively parallel fluid-structure interaction; (ii) to release that code into the community and (iii) to use the new capability to study the performance of "whole" wind farms, insilico. 

Cellular Automata for Multi-scale Fracture

Could cellular automata be used to model mechanisms (for quasi-brittle fracture) that occur at the meso-scale and then feed these mechanisms to a macro-scale finite element model? Is it possible to replace constitutive models with mechanistic models, simulating mechanisms that lead to fracture instead of formulating equations that predict failure? These are typical questions that have motivated my recent collaboration with Dr Anton Shterenlikht at the University of Bristol.

Stochastic Review Paper in Movie Form!

A while ago, I shared news about the recent publication of our review paper titled: "Practical Application of the Stochastic Finite Element Method".  The first author David Arregui-Mena, a PhD student at the University of Manchester, created a YouTube movie which summarises the content of the paper.

For those interested, its worth a watch!

Link to movie

Practical Application of the Stochastic Finite Element Method

If you're interested in stochastic finite element analysis, you might like to know that we've just published a paper that reviews the "practical" application of the method. The paper first outlines the main methods of incorporating uncertainty into engineering computations. It then presents "practical" examples across a range of disciplines of where these methods have been used.

We hope that this paper is a good starting point for those looking to adopt stochastics in their work.

Extinct Kangaroos Couldn't Hop

Another couple of interesting articles to share. Using some "mechanics" principles, researchers have reasoned that 100,000 years ago, kangaroos were too heavy to hop.

A while ago, a different group of researchers published the results of computer modelling (using genetic algorithms) that showed dinosaurs might have hopped and skipped as forms of locomotion! (But only if particularly happy?)

These articles might be good to share with undergraduate engineers for discussion in tutorials. There are issues to discuss with assumptions in both cases. 

Survey of Computing Platforms for Engineering Simulation

How many organisations are using Cloud Computing? Is the use of High Performance Technical Computing in engineering simulation set to grow in the next 5 years? Will Tablet PCs be powerful enough to run my application? What do my peers think?

These are typical questions asked by the engineering simulation community. Wouldn't it be great if we could take a snapshot of the type of computing platform we're using today and also predict where we will be in the next 5 years? 

Cracks found at reactor at Hunterston B nuclear power station

Perhaps some of those on this site have seen the news article on the BBC website yesterday about cracks appearing in the reactor at the Hunterston B nuclear power station. As the article states, cracking in the graphite bricks is predicted and the regulators are happy that the reactor is safe to operate.

Sutured tendon repair; a multi-scale finite element model.

We've recently published an open access journal paper that looks at the mechanics of sutures used to repair severed tendons. A homogenization strategy is used to derive effective elastic properties for tendon fibrils and intracellular matrix. We have found that regions of high stress correlate with the regions of cell death (necrosis) that are sometimes observed in patients.

If this is of interest, please feel free to view the paper here.

 

 

Research Associate in 4D Image based quantification and simulation

An excellent opportunity to work in a world leading team with privileged access to facilities that most researchers can only dream about.

Using engineering to understand biological processes

All

I'd like to share the following paper with you. I think its an interesting example of where
engineering knowledge can be used to help understand biological processes. We used microscope work and finite element analysis to test a hypothesis as to how a biological structure, crimp, forms in tendons. We'd like to continue this work, so all comments welcome.

Were you using FEA in 1995?

All,

Anybody have approximate run times for the following linear static problems:

A) In 1995 on a reasonable workstation

20,000 degree of freedom

B) Now on modern desktop computer with quad core and plenty of RAM

20,000 degree of freedom
200,000 degree of freedom
1,000,000 degree of freedom

Any contributions/guesses/opinions welcome. The scatter will be useful.

Thanks

Lee

Royal Society - International Newton Fellowships

2 Year PDRA Opportunity in:

Image Based Modelling to Improve Damage/Fracture Tolerance in Materials

Teaching FEM to Biologists/Medics

All,

Could anyone recommend courses, online materials or text books that
would be suitable for teaching the finite element method to someone with
a non-engineering background. This request is on behalf of an MD
student wishing to use the FEM for modelling the wrist. We're initially
looking for introductory materials.

Best regards

Lee

The "Goldilocks" Effect in Fossilized Dinosaur Trackways

The following paper is now online:

Falkingham P.L., Bates K.T., Margetts L. and Manning P.L. (2011) "The
'Goldilocks' effect: Presevational bias in vertebrate track
assemblages", Journal of the Royal Society Interface

See: http://rsif.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/early/2011/01/12/rsif.201...

Authors welcome any comments for future studies!

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