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A New Temperature-dependent Modulus Model of Glass/Epoxy Composite at Elevated Temperatures

zhan-sheng guo's picture

Temperature-dependent
modulus of glass fiber/epoxy composite laminates were studied at temperatures
ranging from room temperature up to 120
. The storage modulus, loss
modulus, loss factor, and glass transition temperature of two layer-up composite
laminates were investigated by dynamic mechanic analysis (DMA). Static flexural
modulus was also measured by control force mode in DMA. A new and simple temperature-dependent
model both for the dynamic storage modulus and static flexural modulus was developed.
This model depends only on one parameter which has specific physical meaning. The
model prediction showed excellent agreement with our own experimental results over
the full range of transition region. Furthermore, comparing our model’s
prediction and other experimental data of many types of composites which
studied by other researchers, we point to the fact that our model can be applied many different polymer matrix composites.

 

Accepted by Journal of Composite Materials

Comments

karan dhanjal's picture

karan..sir,which hybrid composites have a better future applications and use?

kindly tell me 

Paul Calvert's picture

"which hybrid composites have a better future applications and use? “

One way of looking at it:  we are trying to make materials with new combinations of properties.  In this case, we are developing tough, soft materials with large fast responses to environmental changes.  You can choose your own details but the aim is to fill in some of the blank areas on the map of all available materials.

There are never real applications for materials that don’t exist yet, but there are obvious potential applications for strong gels in medical implants and tissue engineering.

 Once the materials do exist we can expect many more applications that we had not thought of.  As an example: when polyethylene was discovered by accident in the 1930's it was seen as a very specialized, high cost answer to the problem of insulating high frequency electric cables for radar.  The developers did not foresee its application in plastic buckets and plastic bags.

I can imagine how strong gels might lead to quite new types of devices and machines but your imagination will be as good as mine. 

zhan-sheng guo's picture

Thanks Paul response.

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