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On the suitability of slow strain rate tensile testing for assessing hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility

Emilio Martínez Pañeda's picture

I hope that some of you will find this work interesting. We show that early cracking occurs in slow strain rate tensile testing (SSRT), which compromises the capabilities of this popular experiment for measuring hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility.

On the suitability of slow strain rate tensile testing for assessing hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility

E. Martínez-Pañeda, Z. D. Harris, S. Fuentes-Alonso, J. R. Scully, J. T. Burns

Corrosion Science 163, 108291 (2020)

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0010938X19316464

The onset of sub-critical crack growth during slow strain rate tensile testing (SSRT) is assessed through a combined experimental and modeling approach. A systematic comparison of the extent of intergranular fracture and expected hydrogen ingress suggests that hydrogen diffusion alone is insufficient to explain the intergranular fracture depths observed after SSRT experiments in a Ni–Cu superalloy. Simulations of these experiments using a new phase field formulation indicate that crack initiation occurs as low as 40% of the time to failure. The implications of such sub-critical crack growth on the validity and interpretation of SSRT metrics are then explored.

A pre-print can be found in www.empaneda.com

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