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Faculty positions at University of Houston

Two faculty positions are available in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at University of Houston. One is in the general area of geoengineering (including geomechanics), and the other in the general area of fluid mechanics. Additional information is included in the attached advertisements.

Roberto Ballarini's picture

Faculty positions at University of Houston

Two faculty positions are available in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at University of Houston. One is in the general area of geoengineering (including geomechanics), and the other in the general area of fluid mechanics. Additional information is included in the attached advertisements.

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Piero Villaggio

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Two Ph.D. positions available at University of Houston

Two Ph.D. positions in the general area of mechanics are currently available in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at University of Houston.

Applicants should possess an MS degree in civil, mechanical, or other related engineering field at the time of enrollment at University of Houston. A strong background in continuum mechanics is required.

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Two post-doc positions at University of Houston

Two POSTDOCTORAL ASSOCIATE POSITIONS will be available at University of Houston. The start dates are flexible, and hopefully be filled by the end of Fall 2014. Applicants are sought in the general area of (theoretical and/or computational and/or experimental) solid mechanics, structural mechanics, structural engineering, materials science, and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS).

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An early history of mechanical testing of/using MEMS

I wrote this report a while back, and a limited printing was circulated by Wright Pattterson Air Force Base. I found a scanned version that I attach for your interest.

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Cohesive Zone Models are elasticity

I have always, and I believe correctly, considered cohesize/bridging models linear elasticity. This is because whether we apply them to holes or cracks, we are solving the equations of ELASTICITY, with nonlinear boundary conditions along the part(s) of the crack along which a traction-separation law is applied. So the material model is totally elastic. All we did was to augment the elasticity theory with an ad hoc physical condition (inspired by experiments such as Dugdale).

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Results of our academic investigation of the I-35W bridge collapse

I attach an essay we wrote for a book that will be published by University of Minnesota Press titled "The city, the river, the bridge." The essay is a transcription of part of a public lecture I gave on infrastructure and on the bridge collapse.

After the bridge collapse there were several posts on Imechanica that included speculation about the cause of the collapse, including fatigue crack growth, lack of redundancy, etc.. Our investigation determined the collapse was a result of an undersized gusset plate that reached its plastic limit load. 

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National priorities

The research funding environment we are all experiencing is extremely frustrating, and has the potential for long-term damage to academics and the nation. You may be interested in reading the letter to the Wall Street Journal by two Nobel Prize winners, David Baltimore and Ahmed Zewail.

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Tension Testing of Individual Collagen Fibrils

In a recent discussion it was suggested that it would be useful to perform tension tests on collagen fibrils. We have developed a MEMS-based experimental procedure that is capable of applying very large strains to individual collagen fibrils. The attached paper presents illustrative data; an upcoming paper will present much more data that illustrates the rich behavior of these fibrils during loading and unloading tests.

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Are notes and textbooks a higher priority than journal clubs?

I registered for iMechanica a few days ago, and found many postings instructive. Here is my first blog entry.

The topics being studied today by mechanicians are very difficult (what I often call "dirty problems"). In fact, often the mechanical theories (actually coupled mechanics, biology, chemistry) required to gain improved understanding are still in their infancy. Mechanicians that have entered fields such as mechanics of biological structures have gotten up to speed by paying the price (hopefully an enjoyable time on a learning curve) of reading large numbers of papers and discipline-based books. Many of these papers are cryptic and, while they may be of high scientific quality, they do not have significant pedagogical value to those entering the field (graduate students for example).

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