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Nobel Prize

Mike Ciavarella's picture

More replies to Yavari, fractals, strongly emotional disputes, and what really leads to Nobel prize

Dear Yavari

I have promised more replies on Mandelbrot, fractals, strongly emotive discussions in journals, and here is a coincise statement, which I take from a Nobel prize, prematurely passed away last year.  I think it has a lot to teach (including the kind of attitude that leads to Nobel prize, i.e. close to no human weakness), you will recognize the real name of the "Caesar" in this book is somebody with a 58 pages CV on his web site, most likely.

For a better idea of fractals, read please the other attachment.

Regards

Mike

Percy W. Bridgman

"for the invention of an apparatus to produce extremely high pressures, and for the discoveries he made therewith in the field of high pressure physics"

The Nobel Prize in Physics 1946

 

(b. April 21, 1882, Cambridge, Mass., U.S.--d. Aug. 20, 1961, Randolph, N.H.), American experimental physicist noted for his studies of materials at high temperatures and pressures. For his work he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1946.

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