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FCC metals

Ramathasan Thevamaran's picture

Dynamic Martensitic Phase Transformation in Single-crystal Silver Microcubes

The ability to transform the crystal structure of metals in the solid-state enables tailoring their physical, mechanical, electrical, thermal, and optical properties in unprecedented ways. We demonstrate a martensitic phase transformation from a face-centered-cubic (fcc) structure to a hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) structure that occurs in nanosecond timescale in initially near-defect-free single-crystal silver (Ag) microcubes impacted at supersonic velocities.

Partial Dislocation Tutorial for FCC Metals

It is well known thatdislocations in FCC metals are composed of partial dislocations separated bystacking faults.  When consideringthe reactions of dislocations with each other, such as in DD simulations, it is necessary to determine therelative positions of the partials in order to correctly describe theconfigurations that are created in the reactions.  Here we describe a geometric method for correctly determiningthe relative positions of the partials. The results we obtain can also be found by applying an axiom, or rule,given in the book by Hirth and Lothe. At the end of this tutorial we

Adrian S. J. Koh's picture

Size & Strain Rate MD Study on Metallic Nanowires

Thank you for your interest shown in my previously posted work.  Here's a post-print for an article of an extension to my previous work.  Extension in the sense that the MD simulation was performed on "larger" metallic nanowires (2.0 nm to 6.0 nm), and the behavior of gold (Au) nanowires were studied.  The mechanism behind strain-induced amorphization was explained and the phenomenon of multiple necking was observed, implying the presence of "localized" amorphization instead of a "globalized" one observed in shorter nanowires.

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