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morphogenesis

mokarram76's picture

Numerics of growth-induced deformations

Dear iMechanicians,

Growth-induced deformation or morphoelasticity  is an interesting phenomenon ranging from living tissues to biological plants in nature. We recently publish a paper in JMPS that solves some challenging boundary value problems by addressing few key issues in computational morphoelasticity. It might be interesting for you.  

zichen's picture

One postdoctoral fellow position in solid mechanics/biomechanics available at Dartmouth

One postdoctoral fellow position in solid mechanics/biomechanics at Dartmouth is immediately available in the Chen group at Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth (http://engineering.dartmouth.edu/people/faculty/zi-chen/). The subjects of research include, but are not limited to, cancer cell migration and mechanics of morphogenesis in embryos or plants.

Konstantin Volokh's picture

Why fingerprints are different

A possible explanation of the variety of fingerprints comes from the consideration of the mechanics of tissue growth. Formation of fingerprints can be a result of the surface buckling of the growing skin. Remarkably, the surface bifurcation enjoys infinite multiplicity. The latter can be a reason for the variety of fingerprints. Tissue morphogenesis with the surface buckling mechanism and the growth theory underlying this mechanism are presented in the attached notes.

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