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UK Newton Post-Doc Fellowship in Computational Mechanics

 
Dear All,

A new multi-million pound initiative to fund research collaborations and improve links between UK and overseas researchers has been launched.

The Newton International Fellowships aim to attract the most promising, early stage, post-doctoral researchers working overseas, who do not hold UK citizenship, in the fields of humanities, engineering, natural
and social sciences.

MSc+PhD position Fully Funded -- Massively parallel biomechanics simulation of brain surgery on HECToR

High Performance Computing MSc+Ph.D. position available at the
University of Glasgow on Massively Parallel Brain Surgery Simulation
with the extended finite element method (XFEM and FleXFEM)  (University
of Glasgow) -- funding body is EPSRC.

One year MSc in HPC in Edinburgh (all costs covered by funding) + 3 year Ph.D.  and access to HecToR,
one of the world's largest super-computer, including training with
experts in massively parallel simulation (10,000+ processors).

The Paris equation

The  Paris equation should correctly be referred to as the ERDOGAN-PARIS equation, maybe some more names may be needed.

LEFM is a term bandied about in the text books, but very few texts  know how to define what it means and how it applies.

You can take my course.  What happened to the earlier posts about my course.

Anyone who contributes to my DORN-RAJNAK or HARPER DORN will be given credit.

 

Recent paper in Fracture

kfupm.edu.sa/publications/ajse/articles/3318_P.18.pdf

Is the limit of stress intensity factors "1" when the crack length is close to "0"?

I have read some papers about fracture mechanics of functionally graded materials. I find there are different results for the stress intensity factors when the crack length is close to "0" . In some papers the values of stress intensity factors are "1" when the crack length is close to "0" , but in other papers the values of stress intensity factors are not "1". I obtain the stress intensity factors is "1" when the length of crack is close to "0". I hope to get the explaination about the results.Thanks a lot.

Journal Club Forum for April 15th: Fracture of Ferroelectrics

Ferroelectric materials have seen applications as actuators (the fuel injection system in the latest BMWs), sensors (naval sonar systems), and ferroelectric nonvolatile random access memories (FRAMs). For actuators and sensors it is the piezoelectric behavior of these materials that is exploited, while for FRAMs the ability of the material to “switch” polarization states is the essential feature for the application. 

PhD projects in computational fracture and computational/theoretical fluids at University of Melbourne

The Australian Mineral Science Research Institute (AMSRI) is a consortium of Australia's best scientists working in minerals industry-related fields. Research activities span the breadth of minerals processing, with major themes of the research being energy efficiency, frugal water use and efficient management of waste. The Mathematics program of AMSRI performs modelling and analysis research across multiple minerals processing areas, including comminution, flotation and waste treatment.

Li Han's picture

The effect of porosity on the stiffness and fracture energy of brittle organosilicates

Integrating porous low-permittivity dielectrics into Cu metallization is one of the strategies to reduce power consumption, signal propagation delays, and crosstalk between interconnects for the next generation of integrated circuits. However, the porosity and pore structure of these low-k dielectric materials also strongly affects other important material properties besides their dielectric constant.

Masayuki Wakamatsu's picture

Cutting Mica Sheet

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Hi iMechanica,

yoursdhruly's picture

Traction separation laws in Cohesive zone models - Some Questions

Hello! 

As a student who has spent a lot of time studying cohesive zone models in fracture mechanics, I have several questions that have bothered me over the past year or so, and I have not been able to find suitable answers to them. I am limiting myself here to questions related to the traction-separation law, which invariably forms the basis of CZM as it is implemented today. I am raising these questions in the hope that I can receive some response here, even if it means my question is invalid (as I suspect a few may be).  So here is my list:

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cracking analyses in a bended sandwich beam

I'm studying cracking analyses in a three point loaded specimen of a composed beam.I'm using ANSYS and i want to create codes for estimation of J integral and energy release rate in the vicinity of crack tip.After that i'll calculate the stresses and strains fields,and then i can compare the equivalent fields i retrived using CTOD  and K(I,II,III) factors (according to ANSYS algorithm).

My problem is that I'd like to find a relationship between the above mentioned quantities(J,G)  with K(I,II,III)factors.

Dean Eastbury's picture

Reminder - abstract submission date for 3rd IC Engineering Failure Analysis

The abstract submission deadline for this next conference in the biennial Engineering Failure Analysis series (www.icefa.elsevier.com) is 30 November 2007.

The conference will take place in the coastal town of Sitges, just a short distance from Barcelona's international airport, from 13 to 16 July 2008.    

I hope you can take the opportunity to network in Sitges with people of similar research interests at this informative and well-received single-stream conference. 

Best wishes

Fracture Simulation Using Discrete Lattice Models

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I am trying to implement quasi static fracture in a discrete lattice model, with material being viscoelastic. Do i need to use an incremental-iterative method? Please give your suggestions.

yoursdhruly's picture

Sih's Strain Energy Density Approach in Fracture - why is it not very popular?

Most fracture classes and texts focus on the following different approaches: Griffith's energy approach, Irwin's stress intensity factor approach, the Barenblatt-Dugdale strip yield model (and subsequently, cohesive zone modeling) and Rice's J-Integral approach. As a graduate student studying fracture mechanics, I have often wondered why there seems to be very little discussion in the community with regard to Sih's strain energy density approach. Are there any fundamental limitations to the approach or are there "other" reasons behind this? Your thoughts are appreciated.

Refractory

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hello

i am doing M.tech. i wanted to my destertation in improving the strenght of refractory material. so please guide me what is rectent on this topic...

State-of-the-art understanding of cracking for porous materials?

It seems there are quite a few experimental studies [1,2] on the fracture properties of porous materials, like nanoporous low-k dielectrics, as a function of porosity. Can anyone point out some references on the theoretical part, like the available models, computational methods or analytical approaches that can capture microstructure information, including porosity, pore geometry etc. Interface delamination of porous materials is also of interest. Thanks.

Peridynamic theory vs. classical continuum theory

Dr. Stewart Silling has provided me with a copy of his talk on Peridynamic theory that he presented at McMat 2007.  The PDF file of the talk is attached below.

In order to deal with classical material models and volume constraints, Dr. Silling has modified the original theory to allow for forces that are not necessarily pairwise. A bit on that is included in the talk.

Floating ships of ice and increasing the toughness of glass

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_Habakkuk

I was surprised several years ago when delving into the literature to not find any references about addition of nanoparticles to ice, to study their impact on the mechanics of ice.  In short, to make nanocomposites where the matrix is ice.  So, with 2 high school students from IMSA, the Illinois Math and Science Academy, we set about (with their limited time for a bit of research) to try adding some nanoparticles to water and to freeze it.  The students simply used their home freezers to do this, and their mechanics measurements were with a hammer and chisel...

Markus J. Buehler's picture

Large-scale hierarchical molecular modeling of nanostructured biological materials

There have been several posts recently discussing new directions in computational mechanics. Here is a review article that appeared recently that may be of interest.

Large-scale hierarchical molecular modeling of nanostructured biological materials

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